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last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
that a third airplane flying over washington, d.c., very close to the building we are in, the united states capitol, went down the street less than a mile and crashed into the pentagon. and that was at 9:37 eastern time. then a fourth airplane, we remembered as flight 93, was flying toward washington, d.c., probably the capitol or the white house where some good right thinking folks took control of the plane from a high jacker an they were -- hi jacker and they were -- hijack er and they were crashed in a field. on september 11, 2001, this nation was attacked. 3,000 people were killed that day. it's interesting that the attackers decided to attack the world trade center because people from 90 nationalities were in the world trade center building. the south and the north. so it was more than an attack on america, it was an attack on the people of the world. freedom-loving people. people who believed in living life and liberty. the murder was done by 19 radicals who murdered in the name of religion. of the 3,000 people that were killed, 411 of them were emergency workers. 341 were members of
country. your choice. >>> we would like to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to this, the democratic national convention, as charlotte, north carolina. i'm on the convention floor, i'm wolf blitzer. the first lady of the united states, michelle obama, has tonight's most critical job, reminding voters why they liked her husband enough to put him in the white house, and to make the case for giving him another four years. ining us now inrco all of thiweek,nderson cooper, high above the floor. >> our w sws whyhat case is more urgent than ever for the democrat. nesn mitt romney's convention bous. what are the numbers? their convtion tonight, ts let'slook at that very question. we know governor romney got a one-point bounce out of his convention, not so great, about half what the president got four years ago. not a big bounce. where does that leave us? the democrats' opening night two months from a critical election day. doesn't get any closer than that. 48-48. >> the convention will pay tribute to a champion of health care reform, the late senator edward kennedy,
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
wanted to, first of all, i believe in check and balances in the constitution, and the united states says we should have. i don't want one party running anything. the bottom line is people -- i think 80% of the people in the united states don't even know the constitution, and for limited government, not as a progressive, which, by the way, is what obama is, a progressive, just like hillary clinton, who admitted she was. host: let's not go too far off the rails here. i understand that the constitution, the check and balances that the constitution refers to is between the legislative, the judicial, and the executive branch, and doesn't really mention the establishment of a two-party system. caller: you need a two-party system. look what happened the first two years -- even though it took obama two years to get the healthcare through, they still had everything right there. unless you have a complete representative, you know, in there that represents everyone and just not one side, like all progressives or all republicans, you don't have those checks and balances, whether it's the legislative
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
>>> i accept your nomination for president of the united states. >> president obama makes his case for four more years saying, quote, i never said this journey would be easy and i won't promise that now. >> good morning. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. time now to look at the weather. >> gwen tolbart is in for tucker barnes this morning. >> i know this is wisdom's favorite day. he was saying friday eve yesterday. >> that's right. >> he is excited. >> closing it out. >> we'll close it out pretty good because we've got sunshine for you today. expected to be a dry day and it will be a hot one know. satellite-radar composite showing you not a whole lot going on right now. we have a few clouds and fog well to the west but other than that, things are looking really good out there. yesterday's highs, 84 degrees at reagan national airport. 86 at dulles and 85 at bwi thurgood marshall. 72 at d.c. 69 at baltimore. so another hot day. 90degrees is where we're headed. a southerly wind flow from five to 10 miles per hour. we'll have no shortage of sunshine today so looking good. i'll h
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
,000 people and the president of the united states who want that speech to go off with sunny skies at that hour of the day, star-filled skies at any rate. in the next hour we'll be joined by two very important leaders in the united states congress, congressman elijah cummings and congressman chris van hollen both from the state of maryland. right now we joined by key delegate congress woman degette. good to have you with us. >> it's great being here. >> bill: your presence and your colleagues next hour reminds us that a lot of what the president wants to accomplish cannot be accomplished unless he has a democratic congress. >> that's right. a lot of the accomplishments we were talking about yesterday were achieved when it was democratic congress. after that it was the party of no. the republicans wouldn't even honor the [ inaudible ] of the united states. so a lot of us are saying, if you like what you're hearing, if you really think we need to move this country forward, then you need to elect 25 more democrats to the house, so we can keep the majority back and we
by an arlington, va., next. caller: thank you. ron paul needs to abolish the federal reserve or the united states treasury will take over printing money. then the investments would be safe. thank you. host: jeff, republican line, good morning. caller: good morning. as an individual, i have tried to save, realizing that social security was at risk and so forth. i have spoken to people in houston from argentina. frequently. my boss is from argentina. i have to say that if you are unaware of the debt of economic collapse, you really need to find someone who has experienced it. if our credit rating does collapse and we have to pay realistic interest rates, we could not even make the interest on the debt with our taxes, currently. host: jeff, thank you for the call. with the overall debt now in excess of $16 trillion, "the new york times" phrase -- framed it in terms of saving enough. david on the twitter page has this point -- host: shock is on the phone from hawaii, up early on this sunday morning. caller: yes, they have not saved enough. my social security is very minimal. i have been working for m
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
graduates in the united states right now who are basically indentured servants because they have these brutal unforgiving loans and they don't have jobs to be able to pay them back because wages are declining, we have high entrenched unemployment, and the jobs that are coming back are low wage, insecure, poor benefit jobs. so if you took student loans -- students, who are very good at communicating on the internet, if they decided they were going to create a peaceful revolution in the ballot box, they could do so because our campaign is the one solution that's will to, number one, forgive student debt, instead of bailing out the banks again for another trillion dollars, which is what the latest quantitative easing is going to do, we could -- we could be bailing out the students with the quantitative easing, buying up the bad debt in the student securities, the student loan securities, and essentially wiping out student debt because public higher education is a public good, we provided public education through high school degree, throughout the 20th century, but in the 21st centur
willing, to the united states congress. [cheers and applause] my family's story isn't special. but special is the america that makes our story possible. ours is a nation like no other, a place for great journeys to be made in a single generation no matter who you are or where you come from the path is always forward. america didn't become the land of opportunity by accident. my grandmother's generation and generations before always saw beyond the horizons of their own lives and their own circumstances. they believed that opportunity created today would lead to prosperity tomorrow. that's the country they envisioned and that's the country they helped build. the roads and bridges they built, the schools and universities they created, the rights they fought for and won. these opened the doors to a decent job, a secure retirement, the chance for your children to do better than you did. and that's the middle class, the engine of our economic growth. with hard work, everybody ought to be able to get there and with hard work everybody ought to be able to stay there. and go beyond. the dream of ra
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
take on extreme importance. israeli prime minister warned the united states yesterday that if we don't set clear red lines that would determine when the united states would take military action against iran then he said quote, we have no moral right to say they can't bomb iran. he is really -- >> he has been very frustrated because he would like assurances from the united states where it gets to the point where they feel like they are in trouble -- he is more on the end of imminent is now. and president obama is not going to do that in a public or apparently in a private statement. what he said is exactly what he said, this idea about no moral right, and so -- last night, they had an hour-long phone call, the white house and to some extent the prime minister's office are trying to stamp down on this controversy. they understand there is not a security advantage to airing their dirty laundry. >> bill: we have heard there are definite lines, right, that if iran crosses those lines, we would use military force. but we haven't heard the specific line. i just wonde
of the united states, you can get in touch with us via social media, twitter, and the address there # csspan wa. the facebook.com/c-span or journal@c-span.org. this is an editorial, a piece in "the washington post" with the headline -- "after the party is over." he's talking about what he saw in the republican convention. he says conventions can be memorable events. they're known to energize the party faithful. they can convert never heard-of, barack obama into celebrities. modern day political conventions produce a steady stream of informercial, rather, during primetime all without paying for coverage. conventions have their pitfalls. these affairs have, on occasion, slipped off message, producing sometimes unanticipated adverse events. the violent clashes between police and protesters at the 1968 democratic convention nearly overshadowed the political rough housing on the convention floor. word of this week's incident, rather, in tampa in which two republican guests reportedly threw peanuts at a black cnn camerawoman saying, quote, this is how we feed animals is spreading like wild fire among
.1%. >>> president obama and mitt romney expected to call benjamin netanyahu today, who is in the united states right now. the president has been criticized for not meeting with the israeli prime minister. yesterday secretary of state hillary clinton sat down with him, though, in new york. >>> mitt romney will focus on fund-raising tonight. he hopes to bring in $7.5 million for his campaign at two events in the boston area. romney spent yesterday campaigning in northern virginia. he met with veterans and their families in springfield. romney trails the president in virginia in recent polls. he hopes next week's first presidential debate will give him some momentum going forward. >> you don't have a great opportunity with debates to talk about my vision, vision for the country. the president will talk about his. those who believe we want bigger government, more intrusive government, trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see will vote for him. those who believe we should encourage economic growth, support small business, and create more jobs will vote for me. >> that first debate will take pla
with him. >> i accept your nominates for president of the united states -- nomination for president of the united states. >> reporter: friday before leaving florida romney greeted supporters at a sendoff rally. >> the convtion was a magnificent and wonderful opportunity for us to share our message with the american people thanks in large measure to the folks here in florida and now we really do need you to get out there and get your friends to vote. >> rorter: the president meanwhile headed to el paso, texas, to speak to troops in what was billed as a noncampaign event to highlight the second anniversary of his decision to end u.s. combat in iraq. >> at the time i know some folks didn't believe me. they were skeptical. some thought the end of combat was just war games and semantics, but i meant what i said. >> reporter: but the vice presidential candidates were also in action. in richmond republican candidate paul ryan appeared with house gop leader eric cantor of virginia. >> i don't want to bore you by saying the same thing over again, but it bears repeating. if we stay on the
the tone for the entire convention. >> we will have a new president of the united states. a democrat born not to the blood of kings but to the blood of pioneers and immigrants. >> bill clinton gave the keynote speech. barack obama has given a keynote speech. i'm julian castro. >> reporter: castro knows the burden is on him to appeal to latinos as well as inspire a broader audience of voters. >> the choice that we have to make in this election is whether to continue to invest so that everyone can reach the american dream or whether we're going to scale back from that. >> reporter: with an estimated 12 million latino voters expected to cast ballots in november, both campaigns are fighting hard for their attention. >> can't just trot out a brown face and spanish surname and expect people are going to vote for your party or your candidate. >> reporter: that's why delagara, a professor at columbia university, says the choice of julian castro to deliver the keynote was smart. >> castro brings, as a speaker, a number of important characteristics. he is smart. he's well educated. he is politicall
public investments. our good schools, our universities. medicare, security. and that in the united states when those two have met, when individual initiative has met with a common sacrifice and investment by the nation, that's what's created upward mobility. and the ability to reach the american dream in our society that makes america unique. and i put before the nation the clear choice that we have in this election between a leader in barack obama who will -- who has been doing that, making those investments and will in the future and another leader who would scale back from those investments and therefore i think hinder america's ability to be the land of opportunity going forward for everyone. >> where did you come up with that line of the night? i think it was the best line so far in this convention where you said mitt romney said just ask your old man for money when you want to start a business. you said why didn't i think of that? where did you come up with that great sarcasm? >> what i wanted to do was be optimistic but point out the differences. as the first lady pointed out very
a nuclear weapon. of course the united states and israel has gone back and forth when and if a strike is necessary. the united states secretary of state sat down with prime minister netanyahu yesterday for a meeting. that is not the meeting that the prime minister wanted. he did want to meet with president obama. requested a meeting. that was request was denied. the prime minister offered to fly to washington, d.c. today to meet with president obama. we learned he is spending much of the day at campaign events. back in israel, we look again at the newspaper. not all the reaction is positive. next to the prime minister drawing on the diagram of the bomb is a headline a little bit making fun of him saying bebe, the prime minister's nickname, boom. one headline down here. they have had a caricature of him as bugs bunny drawing on the same diagram, calling the diagram a cartoon. there is feeling among some, doing that at united nations holding up the diagram and drawing the red line was perhaps not fitting the prime minister of israel. gregg? gregg: leland vittert in jerusalem. thank you
. >> look at the united states. we're thinking all of the states east of the mississippi plus throwing in minnesota iowa, montana, arkansas, louisiana the dakotas nebraska, kansas, we've lost an area -- larger than half the size of the united states. >> bill: yeah. what's left? california, oregon and washington. i mean -- >> scary. >> bill: that is really scary. now all of that ice melts. where does all of that water go? right? >> right. by the way -- >> bill: glug, glug, glug. >> that's in ten years' time that we've lost that much. that's sort of mind-blowing. >> bill: think how many centuries it took to build up the ice. so anyhow, it is frightening but jim inhoff and all of the other -- they don't care. they don't think it means anything. it is just cyclical. it will all freeze again next year. that's the way it works. mmm, man. what a line-up today. congressman chris van hollen, the ranking democrat on the budget committee. we haven't seen him in studio since charlotte. he was there with us in charlott
16 women become united states senators, 87 women to join the house of representatives. what we believe is that when we get closer to equal representation, when we see our congress looks like our nation with half the table being women and have the table being man, we will truly move this country forward and a faster way with positive policies for our communities. we are dedicated to change the representation of congress one campaign anytime. host: are there particular issues that you care about? guest: our main issue is women's representation. not a single democratic woman enate n a seat in the st when emily's list started. we do believe the voices of women in these discussions makes so much different to the direction we're going. we rolled out a study at emily's list which lays out what it has meant in the last two decades of having women, even though women are only 17% of congress. we often take things for granted every day. think about maybe you went camping this weekend and you let your child swimming in the la ke maybe you have to leave work to take care of a sick parent. a
. it should happen i very local level, from a council level up to the president of the united states. i think what this election is about, if we're going to frame the debate with respect to black americans, to me, this election is about why is it that in 1960, we had 36% of black males who were incarcerated in 1960. i was reading the moynihan report, which the deceased daniel patrick moynihan wrote for president johnson about the state of black america as he sought in 1964. -- as he saw it in 1964. today, we have 55% of blacks in prison and in 1964, when he wrote this report to give to president johnson, he said the biggest thing he saw, the crisis affecting black americans was the breakdown of black families. at the time, yet 23% of black americans being born into -- you had a 23% of black americans being born into single-family -- single-parent families and today it is 73%. today, the issue is crime and why are so many black males being killed in chicago and philadelphia and the breakdown of the family. whoever you are going to vote for president or on the local level, you should ask how ar
>> i want barack obama to be the next president of the united states. i proudly nominate him to be the standard bearer of the democratic party. ♪ like [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] host: after a 48 minute speech by bill clinton, president obama became the official nominee of the democratic party last night. the first time a former president has nominated a successor. we want to get your reaction to president clinton's speech and to hear what you think president obama should talk about it his acceptance speech tonight. members are on the screen. -- numbers are on the sreen. if you happen to be a de legate and want to talk about what you've seen, we want to hear from you as well. you can also contact us electronically. you can see the different ways there. facebook if you want to make a comment or continue the conversation. or send an e-mail. here is the front page. "the charlotte observer." here is "the wall street journal." from a front-page view of "the financial times." although it is custo
of the united states of america, and to the republic, for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. [ applause ] >> boy, she just looked great, didn't she? >> she did. you can imagine, the amount of therapy and hard work. >> oh. >> that she's had to endure to climb back from being -- she was literally shot in the head. >> in the head at close range. >> close blank range. that was a pretty pivotal time in the nation's conversation about where we stand and the tone of things. >> it was. >> what a symbol of hope she is. that was incredible. >> it was a very moving moment. >>> all right. coming up he nominated his dad, last night for another term as vice president, bo biden, the attorney general of delaware, joins us ahead here on "morning joe." former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, nbc news political director chuck todd and later maryland governor martin o'malley. up next mike allen is here with the politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the weekend forecast. >> good morning to you, mika. let me help get everyone out the door thi
of the united states. it is a job that brings with it a lot of speaking responsibilities and oh, my god, could you see that tonight. first lady tonight, a long, personal, emotionally, frankly excellent speech from michelle obama. chris matthews? >> certainly made the connection, don't you think? i mean, so much of tonight was interactive. it was between her and that audience in the room. i thought the camera work was so important watching this on television. you saw on the faces of men and women, black and white, all different backgrounds, the connection. she was with people. the emotional connection, telling the story of her love affair with her husband. with her life of getting ahead. but there was one big difference than four years ago which just came through in the earlier speeches tonight. it was hope and change, yes, hope and change but not hope and change imaginally overnight. but hope through work and patience and time and effort and then change. i think it was a much more mature look at their own lives as they got there. i'll tell you, i assume most americans watching tonight who have
or whatever, no one is going to turn down the president of united states. it is a very unfair advantage of our tax dollars. host: and this -- and from seattle -- later this morning on the c- span networks and on c-span radio, the house ethics committee is expected to clear charges against representative maxine waters, democrat from california. the piece says -- a staff would not be entirely off the hook. her chief of staff and grandson are likely to be held accountable for reaching housecoats of conduct. when the house ethics committee meets in the republic session at 9:15 eastern time today, that michael moore will be held accountable for seeking to leverage waters' influence to aid a bank. she's been facing a similar conflict of interest charged since 2009. that headline, maxine waters expected to be cleared of conflict of interest charges. if you can watch or listen to the hearings on the c-span networks, c-span radio, and any time on c-span.org. dallas is on the phone from asheville, north carolina. the new york times calling this the least productive congress in a generation. caller: than
to be the next president of the united states. states. >> we'll have more of last night's big speech and a look ahead at tonight's address from president obama including details on a last-minute change of venue. fox 5 news continues right now. >>> live look outside right now. it is thursday, september 6th, as we bring the week to a close. one more day, friday, and then it is the weekend. >> yeah. >> happy thursday. >> happy thursday. >> happy friday eve. >> i know all the kids are back in school. it certainly feels like summer. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm wisdom martin. >> i never heard that term before, friday eve. >> i think julie wright. ed that phrase. >> she did? >> we look forward to the friday because then we know we can sleep. >> for some of us who work on the weekend. >> that's true. we're glad you're here with us. >> turn is on vacation and let's take a look now at satellite-radar composite and show you what is going on there. some of you are see ago few light showers that are popping up out to the west. that will be the story in the course of the morning hours. a few isolated showers a
on record for the west nile virus since it was detected in the united states. >> it was introduced into the united states in 1999, and then it spread over a series of years through the bird population. it got into the mosquitos, and then, of course, the mosquitos bit people. >> reporter: the number of cases this year is skyrocketing. nearly 1600 infections have been reported and 66 deaths, up 40% in just one week. >> it's a late summer disease, so the fact that we've got so many cases this early and it's so widespread really does not bode well. >> every state except alaska and hawaii has seen outbreaks and more than 70% of the cases come from six states. the hardest hit is texas with nearly half of the infections. health officials from coast to coast are launching efforts to prevent the spread of the potentially damage yus disease from the air, to the ground people are on patrol distributing flyers with preventative nervous and symptoms that tend to be mild. in 20% fevers, headaches and body aches and most worry some for people over 70 are with weakened immune systems. west nile vi
around. can elect mitt romney the next president of the united states, and we can get america back on track. >> there's one more stop, this time in louisiana to survey the damage from isaac. back to you. >> craig boswell reporting live. think for the update. >>> obama campaign workers preparing for an event in three doe got a surprise today, a visit from the romney campaign bus. it drove by the rally site, didn't stop. mitt romney will spend much of the week in new hampshire preparing for the upcoming presidential debate. paul ryan is in north carolina today and will be in iowa tomorrow and wednesday. >> the clean up continues for areas along the gulf coast devastated by hurricane isaac and although the number of homes without power has decreased drastically, about 7% of louisiana remains in the dark tonight. fox's casey steegle is in new orleans with the report. >> reporter: no rest for the weary for emergency and rescue crews on the ground in and around the city of new orleans as the cleanup for hurricane isaac continues. today president obama will be visiting the region. in fac
citizens of the united states. he credited churchill with influencing his ideas on foreign policy and the way he talked with the russian counter parts in years to come. then, a few years later, he see the influence of church hill's words and example on ronald reagan and margaret thatcher and the way they mute the special relationship forward. even gorbachev acknowledged the role of the speech in finding a way forward without resulting to directive war. what can it teach us here in the room? the soviet union is in war? in this age we have turned cynical toward the politician. we too often dismiss a speaker on either side as pulling something over on one of us. somebody who has a lot of say but not a lot to do. but i think the right speech, delivered by the right speaker, at the right time has the power with bringing the nation in to a being. as with the decoration of independents. he has the power to -- he warned hit hitler we shall never surrender. it has the power to aspire our enemies to change. ronald region speaking in berlin to tear down the wall to gorbachev, the berlin wall
if mr. romney going to be president of the united states, it's a mistake. this country will be done, done, done. >> host: show you a headline from the washington examiner today. it's an a.p. story. but the headline says obama trying to make a case for sticking with him. they write here julie pace does -- don't expect president obama to try to reinvent himself next week. instead, he and a slew of defenders will seek to convince voters to stick on the president they know rather than gamble on someone they knew. a challenging task that most say is headed in the wrong direction. that's the washington examiner. another paper from north carolina this morning, the sunday news and observer. political speeches fail to sway the beleaguered middle class. north carolina having one of the higher unemployment rates in the country as far as the states go. we'll learn more about the state coming up. >> caller: i would like to thank my previous caller. congress on both sides has been the problem for 40 years. and they've got 10% approval rating. i think they're the ones that should go. both parties,
new plants and train new workers and create new jobs here in the united states of america. >> mr. obama laid out specific goals and proposals for his second term in office. touching on the economy education, medicare, veterans and making a powerful case that we are better off today than we were four years ago. the address beat out every single other convention speech on twitter. according to the web site, president obama had nearly 53,000 tweets per minute compare that to mitt romney's speech that got just 14,000 a minute. one other interesting note, this was the shortest acceptance speech we've heard from a presidential nominee in the last 36 years. mr. obama clocked in at 38 minutes and 23 seconds. according to research from c-span, the last person to go shorter than that was gerald ford and that was in 1976. bill clinton holds the record for the longest speech. he's coming in at about 65 minutes and that was back in 1996. more bill is coming up live from charlotte after the break. as always, we're hoping you will
road in front of him. luigi set off to ride his bike across the united states. he has leukemia and just finished a round of chemotherapy. he rode through ohio and on to chicago, passed stunning views in montana. in just 35 days, he made it across the canadian border and on to vancouver. >> i think i told you when i left, i didn't know whether i was able to, you know, finish one day, let alone the whole ride. i'm here in vancouver with more than 3,000 miles and just, really happy. >> along the way, he blogged and raised money for the leukemia and lymphoma society. >> thank you so much for the support. keep them coming. >> and they did. he wanted to raise $10,000. he raised $25,000 and he didn't just raise money, he raised hope. >> by luigi being able to go out there and do this and say you're not in this alone is really inspirational. >> so many times i thought, let's find an excuse here, because with everybody following me here, i cannot say i'm sorry, i quit. >> he drew strength from friends and family. even from strangers. >> he leaves you with a lot of joy. i think that's the
important innovation in public education over the past generation in the united states. there are many myths and many misconceptions about charters and about the motivations and goals of many in the charter movement. you saw some of that play out in the chicago teachers strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states who think charters are an unmitigated good or alternatively an existential threat. the reality is they are neither of those. we are exceedingly fortunate to have roland prior with us today. i will introduce roland before i introduce the rest of the panel after he finishes. the project has done considerable work with roland. we are fortunate to have been able to do that. he has prepared an extraordinary paper which he is going to summarize. i would say roland's resume is a little hard to read. you would think it must be fake or something. how could anybody have done so much so quickly? i particularly want to know what a titanium lion is but i won't blanc that year. he is doing extraordinarily important and vital and groundbreaking work. if we are going to ever turn
of the united states is weighing in on the controversial call from monday night's game. >> but will the bungled call be enough to budge the two side in the lockout? it's wednesday, september 26th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good what? >> good morning. >> good to have you back. >> it's good to be back in the saddle again. here we go. >> you were on assignment for a little bit. >> two-week assignment working during the daylight. which was strange, unnerving. back on the graveyard shift where i belong. >> missed you. i'm paula faris. we'll have the latest on the nfl referee lockout including the surprising background of the two refs who worked the monday night game. let's just say, lingerie has something to do with it. >>> also this half hour, new wildfire worries. the dangerous and very destructive season shows no signs of letting up. >> and then some big-time backlash for a father who says he was just being honest when he blogged about his two boys and told the world actually which son he likes best. you always see paren
of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indy advisable, liberty and justice for all. >> she was critically wounded last year during a shooting spree in tucson. she resigned from congress to focus on her recovery. >>> the wife of republican presidential nominee mitt romney is rallying women in northern virginia later today. ann romney is coming to leesburg, holding an event called women for mitt. it kicks off around 11:45 this morning. it's expected to cause traffic problems in the area. >>> checking the other top stories now, the district is reporting its first death from west nile virus and health officials say a second person has been hospitalized. these are the first two cases reported in the district this year. maryland has seen 21 cases including one death. in virginia, there have been five cases, but no one has died. earlier this morning tony spoke with dr. ivan walks, the former director of the d.c. department of health. he explained what you need to look out for. >> three to 14 days you may see symptoms. the thing that lets us go
. >> madam chairwoman, delegates, i accept your nomination for president of the united states. >> reporter: facing the political fight of his life, the 44th president of the united states made the case for his re-election, asking americans to stick with him for another four years despite tough economic times. >> our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder but it leads to a better place, and i'm asking you to choose that future. >> reporter: four years later the president felt he had to appeal to voters exhausted by the tone of american politics. >> i know campaigns may seem small, even sill sly sometimes. trivial things become big attractions. if you're sick of me approving this message, believe me, so am i. >> reporter: but obama pulled no punches when it came to his republican rival. his references to opponent turned him into a punch line. >> my opponent is new to foreign policy. you may not be ready if you can't visit the olympics without insulting our closest ally. if you can't afford to start a business or go to college, take my opponent's ad
leamingance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> giffords was critically wounded last year during a shooting spree in tucson. she resigned from congress to focus on her recovery. her rec >>> some of another stories making headlines this morning. district heights police are investigating a shooting that involved an eight-year veteran on the force. this happened yesterday evening on county road. police say the officer opened fire to prevent the escape of a man arrested for allegedly stealing a motorcycle. suspect was shot in the back and taken to a local hospital for treatment. the officer is on administrative leave. >>> the first two cases of the west nile virus have been reported in the district. health officials say one person has died from the virus an another one is in the hospital. maryland has seen 21 cases so far this year including one confirmed death. in virginia, five cases have been reported but no one has died. >>> five dematha high school
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